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On this episode, I have a conversation with specialist Christina Roach

 

Christina Roach is President and Founder of Success for Steps®, a resource for stepfamilies, and specializes in working with individuals in “step” relationships. She is a certified Stepfamily Foundation Master Coach and is a recognized Stepfamily Professional by the National Stepfamily Resource Center. In addition, she is a licensed psychotherapist, a National Certified Counselor and a Distance Credentialed Counselor. She’s been featured in both national print and broadcast media, including Ebony Magazine and NBC’s Daytime. And she’s a contributing writer for StepMom Magazine. Christina has a private practice in Tampa, Florida, and offers phone and webcam coaching for those living outside the area.

 

Some things we discuss in this episode are

  • her Success for Steps program
  • biggest issues blended families face
  • how to overcome difficulties with exes
  • couple arguing over children
  • relationships between step siblings
  • teenagers
  • how to bring your blended family closer
  • benefits of professional counseling

 

Here is how you can connect with Christina

Take her survey here

Success for Steps website

Christina’s facebook

Christina’s twitter

Christina’s LinkedIn

 

 

 

To connect with me

Join the Private Facebook Group

Listen and Rate/Review on Itunes

Connect with me on Facebook

Connect with me on Twitter

Send questions or feedback to melissa@blendedfamilypodcast.com

Send me a voicemail at Speakpipe

 

 

 

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In this day and age, it’s become harder for our children to focus on, and be successful in their education.  The world is a different place now than when we were of school age. Blended families have some extra difficulties with this, especially due to time sharing between two homes.  In this episode we discuss

 

  • distractions from social media
  • exposure to sex and drugs
  • problems with smartphones
  • family dynamics and structure in the present time
  • homeschooling
  • scheduling in homework
  • family time sharing and playing fair
  • project sharing
  • teaching your child responsibility

 

No matter what, it’s essential to do everything you can to help your child succeed!


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Send questions or feedback to melissa@blendedfamilypodcast.com

Send me a voicemail at Speakpipe

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We often hear of children needing to take a timeout for bad behavior.  Did you ever think of an adult taking a time out?  It can actually be extremely helpful and effective in certain situations.

Taking a timeout is essential in times where your anger level is about to reach it’s peak.  Separate yourself before you lose control and say things you may regret later on.  During this time you can focus on your breathing to calm yourself, which will help you deal with whatever situation has come up, in a much calmer state.

 

Other times when a timeout is useful is if you are feeling depressed, overwhelmed, depleted, or anxious. Find activities that bring you peace and relaxation.  Some ideas are a hot bath, reading a book, doing some yoga, or taking a nap.

 

These time out sessions do not have to be long, but they can be.  It’s healthy to figure out when you may need one, and also healthy as a behavior for the children to model. When you get used to doing this, it’s imperative to schedule in regular time during your day, week, and month, for some “you” time.  As parents, we can get stressed out and lose our joy if we aren’t taking the time to nurture ourselves!

 

 

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Raising difficult or manipulative children is so challenging, especially in a blended family home. In cases of divorce, these children are adept at working the parents against one another to get whatever it is that they want.  This behavior can cause lasting damage on the family and your relationship with your partner.

 

The key to success in helping a difficult child is to determine if there is a medical or psychological cause for their behavior. There are many options to get them the help they need.  If a cause is not determined, there are methods of behavior modification in the home that you can use.

 

While taking care of the difficult child’s needs, you mustn’t neglect yourself, your partner, or the other children in the home.  There are coping strategies that can help you all keep your sanity.  All children must grow up someday, and so this season in your life will pass.  Take care of your own mental and physical well being so you can be there for the family who depends on you!

 

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melissa@blendedfamilypodcast.com

Every parent hopes and wishes all of their children get along.  Biological children are built with a special bond with their siblings, whereas step siblings do not automatically have this.  In the blended family, we want to encourage the step siblings to form bonds and relationships with one another for a strong family dynamic.

 

Depending on the ages of the children, there are different ways to accomplish this.  You want to first try to find common ground between them, and arrange activities they can do together that they enjoy.  Sports are good, playing games, or doing projects together are just some ideas. You can also plan family activities that include everyone, such as a trip to the beach, or a picnic.

 

The process of bonding can take years, and it is not something that can be forced.  The more opportunities they have to be together, the better the process should be.  There are times when children just will not like one another, and if this is happening in your family, don’t take it personal.  Your relationship with your partner should not be affected by this.  Their stepsibling bond will change and evolve over time, and you and your partner need to allow them the space to maintain their own relationships.

 

Please comment on the show notes if you have any ideas or suggestions relating to this topic!

 

 

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Send questions or feedback to melissa@blendedfamilypodcast.com

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